Manage Business Units and Tenant Administration

This article contains the following topics:
casm171
HID_Manage_Business_Units_and_Tenant_Administration
This article contains the following topics:
Understand Business Units and Catalog Access
Administrators create and maintain business units (tenants) as the organizational structure that controls access to data. Business units can be:
  • A service provider (the highest level or
    root
    business unit).
  • An external client company, if the service provider provides services to external customers.
  • An internal corporate department or group within a department.
A business unit administrator can:
  • Access the catalog that the business unit publishes.
  • Subscribe accounts to services.
  • Perform other administrative duties for the business unit and its child business units.
The following rules apply when you create your business unit structure:
  • Business units can have child business units.
  • Users can have roles in more than one business unit.
  • Business units can have one or more accounts.
  • Each account can have many users.
  • Each user can have many accounts.
  • Each user who has an account can be billed to that account.
  • When you request a service, the parent business unit of your business unit defines the catalog that you see.
  • When you subscribe an account to a service, the parent business unit defines the catalog that you access.
By default, users and accounts can request or subscribe to items
only
in the catalog of their parent business unit.
Example
Review the following example of a four-level hierarchy of business units, in a default configuration:
Service Provider (SP) is the top-level business unit.
  • A is a child business unit of SP.
  • B is a child business unit of A.
  • C is a child business unit B.
In linear form, you can express the relationship as follows: SP-->A-->B-->C
  • "A" Users and accounts can request or subscribe to items in the SP catalog
    only
    .
  • "B" Users and accounts can request or subscribe to items in the A catalog
    only
    .
  • "C" Users and accounts can request or subscribe to items in the B catalog
    only
    .
To change the default behavior, use the following configuration settings:
  • The System configuration settings
    Use Service Provider Configuration Only
    and
    Use Service Provider Catalog Only
    .
  • The Catalog configuration setting that is named
    Pass Through Catalog
    .
For more information about how to modify configuration settings, see the System Configuration and Catalog Configuration section.
Decide Between Common And Stand-Alone Tenant Administration
Administrators decide between
common
or
stand-alone
tenant administration, as follows:
    • In
      common
      tenant administration, you create and maintain a single tenant structure for CA Service Catalog and CA Service Desk Manager. Both parent and child tenants are created in CA Service Desk Manager
      only
      . You can edit common (shared) attributes of tenants in CA Service Desk Manager
      only
      . CA Service Catalog "inherits" the tenants, their structure, and their common attributes from the CA Service Desk Manager. These features appear as read-only in CA Service Catalog. In CA Service Catalog, you can still edit the CA Service Catalog-specific attributes.
    • In stand-alone tenant administration, you create and maintain tenants in CA Service Catalog only. The parent and child tenants apply only to CA Service Catalog. Tenant administration functions and tenant attributes are not shared between CA Service Catalog and any other product. If CA Service Desk Manager is installed, you create and maintain its tenant structures separately from CA Service Catalog. Stand-alone tenant administration is the default.
    • Common tenant administration ensures efficiency and consistency in your tenant structures for applicable products providing a single point of administration. You can administer tenants once rather than multiple times in CA Service Catalog and CA Service Desk Manager. You can leverage a common data model and thus save costs for multiple service providers and other large organizations.
    • Stand-alone administration provides flexibility for tenant structures across products. Thus, to use separate tenant structures for CA Service Catalog and CA Service Desk Manager, use stand-alone administration. For example,
      • You have installed CA Service Catalog
        without
        CA Service Desk Manager.
      • You have installed CA Service Catalog with CA Service Desk Manager.
        However
        , you want to administer the business units for CA Service Catalog separately from these other products.
    • If you have already implemented separate tenant structures in both products, you perform synchronization activities to enable common tenant administration.
    • Continue using your chosen option for the long term, preferably throughout the life cycles of the applicable products. Perform synchronization activities whenever you change from stand-alone tenant administration to common tenant administration.
    • As a best practice for efficiency and consistency across applicable products, use common tenant administration.
Common tenant administration has no effect on how you manage users and accounts.
Do
not
move a CA Service Catalog tenant if it has a subscription or a request for an associated account. When such subscriptions exist, moving a tenant impacts its business rules and can cause problems in request management.