Shared Codes

This article contains the following topics:
casm1401
This article contains the following topics:
HID_Shared_Codes
In CA SDM, different types of tickets share certain underlying codes, such as priority, severity, impact, and urgency codes. Requests and change orders share some codes, and all types of tickets share other codes.
Consider the following information about shared codes:
  • By default, numeric values rank them.
  • You can modify the codes.
  • You cannot add or delete shared codes.
  • You can use impact, priority, severity, and urgency codes.
Based on your service desk model, set up the following codes:
Shared Codes
Description
Priority
Must be set up for all service desk models.
Severity
Must be set up for internal and combined service desk models.
Impact
Must be set up for internal and combined service desk models.
Urgency
Must be set up for internal and combined service desk models.
 
Priority Codes
Priority codesindicate a ranking order by which the service desk should respond to tickets (that is, they specify the level of attention a ticket should receive). Priority codes are referenced in requests, change orders, and issues; therefore, they apply to all service desk models.
You can use priorities to escalate tickets manually or automatically by monitoring events. In many service desk installations, priority codes are used on the scoreboard to provide analysts with a real-time status of their requests and change orders.
You can assign a service type to a priority code, which is then automatically assigned to tickets when the priority code is specified. This lets you associate a specific level of service to a ticket based on the assigned priority. For example, the system-defined service type, 4-hour resolution, is automatically associated with priority 1. Tickets that are assigned a priority of 1, therefore, are automatically assigned this service type, including all the service type events that are associated with the 4-hour resolution service type.
Severity Codes
Severity codesidentify the extent of the damage to equipment affected by a request. Severity codes are referenced in requests only; therefore, they apply only to internal and combined service desk models.
Severity is often used as a synonym for priority. Some sites use priority only, ignoring severity altogether. If you want to distinguish between how serious a problem is on a technical level (severity) and how quickly you want it handled (priority), you can use severity and priority codes.
Impact Code values helps to calculate the Incident Priority.
Impact Codes
Impact codesmeasure the significance of a ticket on the functioning of the system. For example, if a change order could affect the functioning of the entire system, it would be assigned a high impact. Impact codes are referenced in requests and change orders only; therefore, they apply only to internal and combined service desk models.
Impact and urgency codes are similar, but they have distinct purposes.
Urgency Codes
Urgency codesmeasure the significance of the request for users of the system (that is, they indicate the importance of the request to the overall production environment). For example, if a request could jeopardize the mission of the enterprise, the Urgency code can be a value of 5-Immediate. Urgency codes are referenced in requests only; therefore, they apply only to internal and combined service desk models.
Urgency and impact codes serve distinct purposes, but are often confused because they coincide. For example, a request to report a fire in a critical data center can have a 3-Single Group Impact and 5-Immediate Urgency. These codes apply because the fire impacts more than one group but not necessarily the entire organization. Because the data center is critical for operations, the urgency requires immediate attention.