MSP: Project Integration with
Classic PPM

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Integrate
Classic PPM
and Microsoft Project to manage aggregated projects, master projects, subprojects, and baselines. You can open project plans offline and save from Microsoft Project to
Classic PPM
.
2
Save a Project To
Classic PPM
You can save a project from Microsoft Project in
Classic PPM
or as a file on your computer. When you save a project, the database saves copies of the MPP and XML files. The unmapped fields and global settings in the MSP Organizer are preserved for the next session.
Follow these steps:
  1. Open a project.
  2. Click the
    File
    menu.
  3. Click
    Save
    in the
    Classic PPM
    Integration menu.
    The project is saved and is available in
    Classic PPM
    .
  4. (Optional) Click
    Save As
    to save the project as a new file. This feature requires that you have
    project create
    access rights. Enter a unique identifier in the Project ID field. If you use Project ID autonumbering, the interface retrieves the next autonumbered ID during a Save As to
    Classic PPM
    .
  5. Select the
    Tracked
    check box to enable track mode in
    Classic PPM
    . To save the project and preserve the actual hours that were entered in Microsoft Project, do not select the
    Tracked
    check box.
  6. Click OK.
    The project name is duplicated in
    Classic PPM
    . You can rename the project in Microsoft Project or in
    Classic PPM
    .
Open a Project Plan Offline
You can work on a project offline and then import the changes into
Classic PPM
.
Follow these steps:
  1. Click the File menu and select Save.
    The offline version of the project is saved locally.
    Do not save using the Save option from the
    Classic PPM
    Integration menu.
  2. Exit Microsoft Project.
    The
    Do you wish to retain the lock on
    <project name>
    dialog appears.
  3. Click Yes to prevent other users from editing the project.
    The project is locked for your use.
  4. Click Save from the
    Classic PPM
    Integration menu after you complete your offline edits.
    The offline changes to the project are saved.
  5. Open the plan and verify that you see the changes from
    Classic PPM
    in Microsoft Project.
    The following updates occur:
    • The MPP file is downloaded from
      Classic PPM
      to Microsoft Project.
    • The MPP file of the same name on your computer is overwritten.
    • The Microsoft Project plan displays the updates that are made or collected. Updates include changes to time sheets, tasks, project teams, and resource assignments.
    • You see the most current version of the project plan.
Manage Aggregated Projects
With
Classic PPM
and Microsoft Project, you can manage aggregated projects. Both applications support the creation of master projects and subprojects.
Classic PPM
also supports the creation of portfolios and programs.
The following information explains the differences between each aggregation approach and offers suggested best practices:
  • Project:
    This approach provides a collaborative framework to define and track the work that the project team executes. A project tracks the following project items:
    • Tasks
    • Staff
    • Forecast
    • Budgets
    • Actual work effort
    • Costs that are associated with labor and nonlabor
    • Risks
    • Issues
    • Change requests
  • Program:
    This approach identifies the related projects and acts as a framework. Programs also provide a top-down view of all of the projects within a program.
  • Master project and Subproject:
    A master project acts as a reference to the subprojects. The subprojects are a part of and have the same functionality as a master project. You can achieve the following tasks:
    • Group the projects under a master project as subprojects.
    • Add many subprojects to a master project.
    • View the combined actuals and ETC of the subprojects.
    • Establish the subproject links that allow you to create plans and to analyze an individual project.
    • View, summarize, and analyze the progress of several projects at the master project level.
    • Use master projects with subprojects to perform hierarchical planning and resource allocation for projects.
  • Portfolio:
    This approach describes a collection of investments that share a common budget or compete for funds. Portfolio investments include projects, ideas, applications, and assets. You can use a portfolio to achieve the following tasks:
    • Analyze and compare values such as ROI and risk.
    • Run possible scenarios to refine the execution strategies and tactics. You can base the tactics on limited assets such as resources and funding.
Aggregation Guidelines
  • Program:
    Use the program aggregation when you need low-level detailed project metrics for rolled-up reporting.
  • Master and Subproject:
    Use the master and subproject aggregation while grouping projects that have a scheduled relationship among them. For example, Project 2 starts when the Project 1 deliverable is complete. Then, Project 3 starts after completing Project 2, and so on.
  • Portfolio:
    Use portfolio aggregation for possible scenario modeling and high-level rolled-up reporting for different project metrics.
The following table describes the attributes, programs, and master projects:
Attributes
Program
Master Project
Regular Project
Comments
Display sum of values from subprojects
Yes. For more information, see Manage Master Projects Using
Clarity
.
No
Not Applicable
You can view the combined actuals and effort for all of the projects in a program. Not available from master projects.
Assign staff members to the projects
No
Yes
Yes
No comments.
View a consolidated list of staff members and the respective values across the group of projects
Yes
No. Only shows the staff members in the Master Project
Not Applicable
The staff list that appears on a program is read-only and aggregated from the subprojects. You cannot edit this list.
Add participants in the Collaboration section
Yes
Yes
Yes
You can add participants to programs, master projects, and subprojects.
Create and apply a Work Breakdown Structure (WBS)
No
Yes
Yes
No comments.
View a collective Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) across all projects in the Gantt View
Yes
Yes
Yes
You cannot staff or add non-milestone tasks to programs, so you cannot create and apply a WBS to programs.
Create Tasks
Milestones only
Yes
Yes
You can add key milestones to programs, but you cannot add key tasks or task estimates.
Use Planning features
Yes
Yes
Yes
You can create budgets and forecasts for programs and projects.
Display consolidated information across the grouped projects.
Yes
Yes
Not Applicable
No comments.
Financially enable or enable the ability to track costs to the project, from time sheets
No
Yes
Yes
A program cannot be financially enabled.
Connect to Scheduling Tools (Open Workbench and Microsoft Project)
Read-only
Read/Write
Read/ Write
The program does not contain tasks of its own. You can view a program as read-only in Open Workbench and Microsoft Project.
Auto-schedule across all related projects
No
Yes
Yes
The key functional difference between a Program (cannot Autoschedule) and a Master/subproject.
Baseline across all grouped projects
Yes
Yes
Yes
No comments.
Displays a consolidated view of all grouped projects
Yes
No
Not Applicable
The Program Dashboard view consolidates the data from across the multiple associated projects.
Manage Master Projects Using
Classic PPM
You can create a master project and configure it with subprojects in
Classic PPM
.
Follow these steps:
  1. Createa project in
    Classic PPM
    .
    The new project is the master project and acts like a framework. Do not staff resources to the project team, create tasks, or track actuals to this master project.
  2. Create subprojects in
    Classic PPM
    .
    The subprojects are the working projects. You can staff resources to the project team, create tasks, or track actuals to this master project.
  3. After the subprojects are created, add them to the master project.
When you open a master project in Microsoft Project, all related subprojects also open.
Microsoft Project Shared Resource Pool Project
With the legacy Microsoft Project Interface, you can have a shared resource pool project. When you open a master project in Microsoft Project, the subprojects are opened and linked to the master project. A shared resource pool project is created locally when resources are shared across multiple projects.
Example: Shared Resource Pool Project
<project name>_pool.mpp
This shared resource pool project allows the master project to share its resources with its subprojects. The shared resource pool is associated with the master project and opens only when you open the master project. When you save a master project in Microsoft Project back to
Classic PPM
, all project teams update with the resources from the shared resource pool. The subprojects must be read/write.
The Microsoft Project Interface (updated version) integrates resources that are shared across multiple projects through the master project resource sheet.
Resource Sharing
  • When you open a master project for the first time, the resources from all subprojects are merged into the master project resource sheet.
  • You can open a subproject independently without opening the related master project and the sibling subprojects.
  • When you save a master project back to
    Classic PPM
    , all project teams are maintained on their respective projects.
  • When you save a master project back to
    Classic PPM
    , the master project does not save the team list to
    Classic PPM
    . In this case, the master project is saved to your computer. You can save a local copy of the master project to your computer using the Save option from the Tools menu.
  • When you open a master project in Microsoft Project, the related subprojects open and link themselves to the master project.
  • If there are no assignments for a team member, the team member is removed from the subproject when you save the subproject in
    Classic PPM
    .
Export a Baseline
A baseline shows a snapshot of the entire project plan. When you export a current baseline revision to a MPP file from
Classic PPM
, a snapshot of the project is exported. Downloading a baseline for a large project might take several minutes. The application can support unlimited baselines, but Microsoft Project supports only 11 baselines.
Classic PPM
has integration business rules to manage and download the 11 baselines from Microsoft. The time that is required to export a project to Microsoft Project increases with each additional baseline.
Multiple baselines are managed by saving each revision in one of the 11 baseline slots in the MPP file. For example, the information for the current revision is saved to the baseline slot. The previous baseline revision is saved to the baseline 1 slot and the last baseline revision is saved to baseline 10 slot. A maximum of 11 baseline revisions are sent in a descending order by the last modified date. The baseline field without an appended number is marked as the current revision.
Information about each of the 11 baseline revisions is saved to the MPP file.
  • The current revision is used to update the project plan baseline information. Any remaining baseline revisions are used to update the project plan other baseline slots (that is, baseline through baseline10) in the order that they are received.
  • If the project in Microsoft Project has baseline information for which there is no matching revision information, that baseline is cleared.
  • If no baseline revisions are sent, all baseline information in the MPP file is cleared in Microsoft Project.
We recommend that you download only the current baseline revision to Microsoft Project. The download current baseline setting impacts all users and all projects.
Follow these steps:
  1. Select Project Management Settings in
    Classic PPM
    .
  2. Click Administration.
  3. Select the Only Export Current Baselines When Opening Investments in a Scheduler check box.
When saving the project to
Classic PPM
, Schedule Connect checks each possible baseline slot in the project.
Classic PPM
verification starts with the baseline slot and ends with the baseline10 slot.
  • If a baseline slot has information, the revision information from the MPP file is sent to
    Classic PPM
    .
  • If no information is available from a baseline slot from the MPP file, the revision is considered new. The default ID, name, and description of the baseline are used for the revision. For example, the information is from the baseline3 slot. The number 3 is appended to the default ID, name, and description.
If the MPP file contains information for a revision that has an empty baseline slot, Schedule Connect sends the revised information to
Classic PPM
. A Delete flag tells
Classic PPM
to delete the baseline revision.
Classic PPM
does not support creating a partial baseline of tasks. You can update an existing baseline by baselining only the new tasks in
Classic PPM
or Microsoft Project when an initial baseline exists. As a best practice, update only the new tasks.
Save Master Project Baselines in Microsoft Project
If you are using
Classic PPM
with Microsoft Project and creating multiple baselines for a master project, a baseline (Baseline1) is created for the master project and its subprojects. When you save the master project back to
Classic PPM
, the baseline information for the master includes the values from the subprojects. For example, a master project has a task with five hours of ETC, and its two subprojects have a task with ten hours ETC each. When you save the project back to
Classic PPM
, the master project baseline usage is 25 hours.
  1. Open a project in Microsoft Project.
  2. Navigate to Tools, Tracking, and select Save Baseline from the menu.
    For more information, see the Microsoft Project online help documentation.
Open Subprojects in Microsoft Project
You can insert
Classic PPM
projects as subprojects into a project that you have open in Microsoft Project (MSP).
Subprojects
open as read/write or read-only depending on how you opened the master project from
Classic PPM
. The read/write status for each of the subprojects also determines how they open.
Use care when linking subprojects to multiple master projects. You can reference subprojects many times from different projects.
When you open a subproject from
Classic PPM
in Microsoft Project, you open it as read/write or read-only. The access depends on how you open the master project and the read/write status for each of the subprojects. Subprojects that you open as independent projects open without any associations to their master projects or shared resource pools. Opening a subproject and linking it to its master projects creates a shared resource pool project to share resources across multiple projects.
When you open a project in read-only mode, subprojects opened with it are loaded as separate MPP files and are also opened in
Classic PPM
in read-only mode. If the subproject is already open, it remains open in read/write mode with any of its subprojects.
You can update read/write master projects and subprojects, and link master projects to other master projects from different computers.
Save Subprojects in Microsoft Project
You can save a subproject that you have open in read/write mode by saving the master project in Microsoft Project back to
Classic PPM
. The following conditions are verified before a subproject is saved:
  • The subproject exists in
    Classic PPM
    . If it does not exist, you cannot update or create the project.
  • You have sufficient access rights to update a subproject open in read/write mode. If you do not have sufficient access rights, you cannot update the referenced subprojects.
  • The subproject is locked. If it is not locked, you cannot update the project.
  • The subproject version in Microsoft Project matches the version in
    Classic PPM
    . If it does not match, you cannot update the project because newer versions of the subproject exist in
    Classic PPM
    . You cannot force a save on subprojects.
  • The resource or charge code exists in
    Classic PPM
    . If it does not exist, you cannot update the project.
Access Rights and Subproject Locks in Microsoft Project
Access rights and locks control subproject access. When you open a master project from
Classic PPM
in Microsoft Project, the access rights and locks are verified in all subprojects. The following information is verified:
  • Insufficient access rights to open the subproject as read-only. If you do not have sufficient rights to the subprojects, you cannot open a master project. You are informed that you have insufficient rights to the subprojects.
  • Insufficient access rights to open the subproject as read/write, but sufficient access rights to open it as read-only. If you try to open a master with subprojects as read/write when you only have read-only access rights, you are informed. If you have sufficient access rights, you can open the subprojects as read-only.
  • Unable to acquire a lock because another user locked the project. If you open a master project with subprojects (locked by another user) as read/write, you are informed and can open them as read-only.
  • Unable to acquire a lock because the project is already locked. If you open a master with subprojects (that you have locked) as read/write, you are prompted to reacquire the lock. You must also roll back the projects to their current versions in
    Classic PPM
    .
If you have the subproject already open as read/write in Microsoft Project, this version is used instead of opening another version from
Classic PPM
.