Item Path and Item Access

The access method for item paths and items is View access. View access defines who can view an item or item path and, in the case of an item path, all of its contents recursively including sub-paths and items.
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The access method for item paths and items is View access. View access defines who can view an item or item path and, in the case of an item path, all of its contents recursively including sub-paths and items.
New access is implicitly granted to Public when loading a repository that creates an item or path, or when checking in items. Users set access of an item only when they want to modify access to that item or path. This behavior avoids manual access setup for item or path objects. From the Workbench, the user does not need View Repository access to see an item or item path; the user simply needs View access to the item or item path. Users who do not have View access do not see the item in any
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window or dialog.
The list of User Groups with Access on the Access tab of an object's Properties dialog includes the user groups that have been granted View access to the item. When a user group is deleted from the list, it is not granted View access to the item. If a user is a member of at least one user group that has been granted View access to an item, the user is granted View access to the item.
To check out an item for Browse or Synchronize, a user needs at least View access. To check out an item for Update or Concurrent Update, or to reserve an item, the repository to which this item belongs should be assigned to the baseline with the Read/Write option instead of the Read/Only option. This type of access is different from other access methods and it is set in the Configure Baseline dialog of the Administrator application project setup.
GRANT methodology on item access is as follows:
  • Adding View access to an item propagates downwards to
    all
    its descendants and upwards to
    all
    its ancestors. (A
    descendant
    is an item or item path that is reached by navigating down from a given item in the Administrator interface to repository items. An
    ancestor
    is an item path that is reached by navigating up from a given item in the Administrator interface to repository items.)
  • Removing View access from an item propagates
    only
    downwards to
    all
    its
    descendants
    .
  • Only the item access changes are propagated.
  • New items created using load repository or check-in items inherit View access settings from the parent directory.
  • Items created at the root of a repository inherit Public as View access.
For example, the following illustration shows D1 at the root of the repository:
D1 at the Root of the Repository
D1 at the Root of the Repository
Note:
(Public) is inherited from the root of the repository by D1 and
all
its
descendants
.
For example, the following illustration shows REMOVE (Public) View access from D3:
REMOVE (Public) View access from D3-2
REMOVE (Public) View access from D3-2
The removal of (Public) has
only
propagated downwards to
all
descendants
of D3.
For example, the following illustration shows GRANT (GRP3) View access to D3:
GRANT (GRP3) View access to D3
GRANT (GRP3) View access to D3
 
(GRP3) has propagated downwards to
all descendants
of D3 and upwards to
all ancestors
of D3.
For example, the following illustration shows GRANT (GRP1) View access to D1:
GRANT (GRP1) View access to D1
GRANT (GRP1) View access to D1
 
(GRP1) has propagated downwards to
all descendants
of D1.
Only
the change to D1 (addition of GRP1) has been propagated.
For example, the following illustration shows GRANT (GRP2) View access to D2:
GRANT (GRP2) View access to D2
GRANT (GRP2) View access to D2
 
(GRP2) has propagated downwards to
all descendants
of D2 and upwards to
all ancestors
of D2.
For example, the following illustration shows REMOVE (GRP3) View access from D3:
REMOVE (GRP3) View access from D3
REMOVE (GRP3) View access from D3
 
The removal of (GRP3) has
only
propagated downwards to
all descendants
of D3.
For example, the following illustration shows LOAD D4 below D1:
LOAD D4 below D1
LOAD D4 below D1
 
(Public, GRP1, GRP2, GRP3) are inherited from D1 by D4 and
all
its
descendants
.
For example, the following illustration shows REMOVE (Public) View access from D1:
REMOVE (Public) View access from D1
REMOVE (Public) View access from D1
 
The removal of (Public) has propagated downwards to
all descendants
of D1.