Host Monitoring Metrics

You can monitor the performance and health of host servers with the following host monitoring metrics:
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You can monitor the performance and health of host servers with the following host monitoring metrics:
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    CPU|Core<Id>|UtilPercent
    The percentage of time over the sample period that the system's CPU was utilized.
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    CPU|Core<Id>|IdlePercent
    The percentage of time over the sample period that the system's CPU was idle.
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    CPU|Core<Id>|SysPercent
    The percentage of time over the sample period that the system's CPU was executing the kernel or operating system.
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    CPU|Core<Id>|UserPercent
    The percentage of time over the sample period that the system's CPU was executing in user mode.
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    CPU|TotalIdlePercent
     
  • The percentage of time over the sample period that the system CPUs were idle
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    CPU|TotalSystemPercent
     
    The percentage of time over the sample period that the system CPUs were executing the kernel or operating system
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    CPU|TotalUserPercent
     
    The percentage of time over the sample period that the system CPUs were executing in user mode
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    Memory|MemInUsePercent
    The percentage of system memory that is in use. You can get the approximate value of this object by dividing the memory in use by total memory that system has. Convert the result to a percentage. Do not use this value alone to judge how loaded a system is, also monitor the SwapInUsePercent metric.
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    Memory|SwapInUsePercent
     
    The percentage of total swap that the host is using. This metric is included for convenient polling, monitoring, and history sampling. This object is an aggregate value over all the swap partitions and areas. To compute the object value, divide the amount of system swap space in use by the total system swap space. Multiply the result by 100.
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    Network|Interfaces|<IP Address>|InDiscards
    The number of inbound packets that Host Monitoring chooses to discard, although the agent has not detected any errors. Discarding prevents the packets from being delivered to a higher-layer protocol. One possible reason for a packet discard is to free up buffer space. Counter value disparities might occur at management system re-initialization and during other times. 
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    Network|Interfaces|<IP Address>|InOctets
    The total number of octets that are received on the interface, including framing characters. 
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    Network|Interfaces|<IP Address>|OutOctets
    The total number of octets that are transmitted out of the interface, including framing characters.
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    Network|Interfaces|<IP Address>|OutDiscards
    The number of outbound packets that the Host Monitor chooses to discard, although no errors have been detected to prevent their transmission. One possible reason for discarding such a packet could be to free up buffer space.
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    Network|Interfaces|<IP Address>|OutErrors
    For packet-oriented interfaces, the number of outbound packets that could not be transmitted because of errors. For character-oriented or fixed-length interfaces, the number of outbound transmission units that could not be transmitted because of errors.
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    Network|Interfaces|<IP Address>|QueueLength
    The length of the output packet queue in number of packets.
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    Network|TCP|AttemptFailures
    The number of times that Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) connections make a direct transition to the CLOSED state The value includes transitions from either the SYN-SENT state or the SYN-RCVD state. Added to the value are the number of times that TCP connections have made a direct transition to the LISTEN state from the SYN-RCVD state. This metric is represented as a count of incidents during the last 15-sec collection interval.
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    Network|TCP|EstablishedConnections
    The number of TCP connections for which the current state is either ESTABLISHED or CLOSE-WAIT.
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    Network|TCP:ResetConnections
    The number of times that TCP connections have made a direct transition to the CLOSED state from either the ESTABLISHED state or the CLOSE-WAIT state. This metric is represented as a count of the incidents during last 15-sec collection interval.
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    StorageName
    A description of the type and instance of the storage. On UNIX/Linux systems, you can enable storage filters to configure the mount points that will be taken into account and displayed for this metric.
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    Storage|StorageName|Size(Blocks)
    The storage size in blocks as reported by operating system. Usually the block size is 1 KB. The memory is shown in blocks.
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    Storage|StorageName|Used(Blocks)
    The amount of the storage that is represented by this node that is allocated. The memory is shown in blocks.
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    Storage|StorageName|BlockSize(Bytes)
    The size, in bytes, of the data objects allocated from this pool. If this node is monitoring sectors, blocks, buffers, or packets, for example, this number will commonly be greater than one. Otherwise this number will typically be one.
  • (Linux)
     Storage|StorageName|PercentUsed
     
    The percentage of used blocks, obtained by dividing Used (Blocks) by Size (Blocks)