cdm IM Configuration

This article is for probe versions 5.6 and later.
uimpga-ga
cdm_IM
This article describes the configuration concepts and procedures to set up the CPU, Disk, Memory Performance Monitoring (cdm) probe. You can configure the probe to monitor the CPU, disk, and memory performance of the system on which the probe is deployed. The probe automatically identifies components and allows you to specify QoS parameters and thresholds for alarms.
Use cdm version 5.61 or later with cluster version 3.33 or later to view the cluster disks on the cdm Infrastructure Manager (IM).
This article is for probe versions 5.6 and later.
The following diagram outlines the process to configure the cdm probe.
Configuring cdm IM
Configuring cdm IM
Contents
2
Verify Prerequisites
Review the following prerequisites in cdm (CPU, Disk, Memory Performance Monitoring) Release Notes before you configure the probe:
  • Verify that required hardware, software, and related information is available.
  • (Version 5.90)
    Enable FIPS encryption on the system where the probe is deployed. For more information, see
    Enable FIPS Encryption
    section.
(Optional) Configure General Properties
You can change the default configuration of your probe if the default settings do not meet your needs. The probe is active and immediately attempts to publish data after installation with the default configuration. You can configure the logging properties and global QoS and alarm source and target parameters for the probe:
Follow these steps:
  1. Navigate to the
    Setup > General
    tab.
  2. Update the following field information:
    • Log level
      : specifies the level of details that are written to the log file. You can select the following log levels:
      • 0 - Logs only severe information (default)
      • 1 - Logs error information
      • 2 - Logs warning information
      • 3 - Logs general information
      • 4 - Logs debugging information
      • 5 - Logs tracing/low-level debugging information
      Log as little as possible during normal operation to minimize disk consumption, and increase the amount of detail when debugging.
    • Log size
      : specifies the maximum size of the log file, in kilobytes.  When this size is reached, new log file entries are added and the older entries are deleted.
      Default: 100 KB
    • Send alarm on each sample:
      allows you to generate an alarm on each sample, if selected. If not selected, the probe waits for the number of samples (specified in the
      Samples
      field of the
      Control properties
      tab) before sending the alarm. For example, if the
      Interval
      value is 1 minute and the
      Samples
      value is 2 under the
      Control Properties
      tab, and if this option is:
      • Unchecked:
        the probe generates the first alarm in 2 minutes and respective alarm at 1 minute interval.
      • Checked:
        the probe generates the first alarm in 1 minute and each respective alarm at 1 minute interval.
        Default: Selected
        The sample collected at the start of the probe is considered as the first sample. The sample count is cleared on de-activation of the probe. For more information, see Configure Control Properties.
    • Send short name for QoS source:
      allows you to send the host name. If not selected, sends the FQDN (Fully Qualified Domain Name).
      If the
      Set QoS source to robot name
      option is selected in the controller, robot name is used as target.
    • Allow QoS source as target:
      allows you to use the QoS source as the target name and QoS messages can use the host name as their target, by default.
    • (Linux, Solaris, AIX and HP-UX platforms only) Calculate Load Average per Processor:
      allows you to calculate the load average per processor. For all Unix-based systems, the system load measures the computational work performed. This means that if your system has a load of 4, then four running processes are either using or waiting for the CPU. Load average refers to the average of the computer load over several periods of time.
      Default: Selected
  3. Click
    Apply
    .
(Optional) Configure Control Properties
Configure the following, as needed:
You can configure the global monitoring interval and sample count for the probe to calculate the values used to determine the alarm conditions. You can also configure the following parameters:
  • Global monitoring interval and sample count for the probe to calculate the values and determine the alarm conditions
  • Filesystem parameters in disks
  • Timeout (Non-Windows platforms) in disks
  • QoS targets for CPU and memory
Follow these steps:
  1. Navigate to the
    Setup > Control Properties
    tab.
  2. Update the following field information to configure the global interval and sampling details for disk, CPU, and memory monitoring:
    : Reduce this interval to generate alarms and QoS frequently. A shorter interval can also increase the system load.
    • Interval:
      specifies the interval (in minutes) after which the monitoring information is obtained.
    • Samples:
      specifies the number of samples the probe stores. This number is used to calculate values to compare with thresholds.
      : Set the sample value to 0 to use the default sample value for QoS messages for
      disks
      .
    • QoS Interval (Multiple of 'Interval')
      : specifies the monitoring interval between each sample collection for QoS information. For example, If the interval is set to 5 minutes and number of samples is set to 5, the average CPU utilization for the last 25 minutes is displayed in the QoS message.
      If “the value is greater than 1, the probe only calculates the average data for CPU monitoring. For disk, memory, and paging QoS messages, the probe generates the QoS messages with the current value. The probe only uses the QoS Interval to reduce the frequency of QoS messages.
    On Solaris Global Zone platforms, the probe executes the command
    echo ::memstat | mdb -k
    to retrieve the buffer and cache memory values. Ensure that the specified alarm and QoS intervals in the probe are greater than
    mdb
    command response time. Otherwise, perform one of the following options in the Raw Configuration interface:
    • Set the value of
      mem_buffer_timeout
      key to a desirable time lesser than the profile execution interval time. The default value for this key is
      25 sec.
    • Set the
      mem_buffer_used
      key to
      Yes
      so that the probe does not execute this command. For more information about this key, see cdm Advanced Configuration.
  3. Update the following field information in the
    Disk properties
    section to configure the filesystem parameters:
    • Ignore Filesystems:
      defines the file system to be excluded from monitoring. For example, specify the regular expression
      C:\\
      to exclude the C drive of the system from monitoring. A red symbol is displayed next to the disk drive which is excluded from monitoring in the
      Disk usage
      section of the
      Status
      tab.
      On UNIX platforms, use the regular expression
      (/\)
      to exclude the root directory
      (/)
      from monitoring.
    • Filesystem Type Filter:
      specifies the type of filesystem to be monitored using regular expressions. The Filesystem Type Filter does not disable monitoring for file systems already discovered and configured. This filter only prevents the probe from discovering a file system.
      • If we specify RegEx as *, then all filesystems are enabled for monitoring. Or you can also specify ext* to allow monitoring of filesystems with "ext". For example ext4 or ext5.
      • If we specify a negative RegEx, then specified filesystems are excluded from monitoring. For example, if we do not want to monitor ext4 filesystem, use /^(?!ext4)/
      • If this field is blank, no filesystem is enabled for monitoring. (default)
    • (Non-Windows platforms only) Timeout:
      specifies the maximum time for the probe to collect monitoring information. For example, timeout for disk fail or crash scenarios in stale filesystems allow you to prevent the probe from going into a pending state. You can specify the default timeout of 5 seconds to retrieve the disk statistics.
      CA recommends a value of 10 seconds when the monitored system has high CPU load.
  4. Select
    Set QoS Target as 'Total'
    in the
    CPU properties
    section to specify the source of the QoS for
    Total (Individual as well as Average)
    from the hostname to
    Total
    . The following SQL scripts demonstrate how to update old data to confirm with when the QoS Target as
    Total
    is changed:
    • QOS_CPU_USAGE
      Execute the following SQL query in the UIM database to view the rows to be updated:
      SELECT * FROM dbo.s_qos_data
      WHERE probe LIKE 'cdm'
      AND qos LIKE 'qos_cpu_usage'
      AND target NOT IN('user','system','wait','idle')
      Execute the following SQL query in the UIM database to update the table for the new target.
      Target
      is the new QoS target to be set and
      Source
      is the QoS source for which target is changed. You can configure both the values, as applicable.
      Declare @Target varchar(100) Declare @Source varchar(100)
      SELECT @Target = 'Total'
      SELECT @Source = 'tsuse10-32'
      UPDATE dbo.s_qos_data
      SET target=@Target
      WHERE source LIKE @Source
      AND probe LIKE 'cdm'
      AND qos LIKE 'qos_cpu_usage'
      AND target NOT IN('user','system','wait','idle')
    • QOS_CPU_MULTI_USAGE
      Execute the following SQL query in the UIM database to view the rows to be updated:
      SELECT * FROM dbo.s_qos_data
      WHERE probe LIKE 'cdm'
      AND qos LIKE 'qos_cpu_multi_usage'
      AND (target NOT LIKE 'User%'
      AND target NOT LIKE 'System%'
      AND target NOT LIKE 'Wait%'
      AND target NOT LIKE 'Idle%')
      Execute the following SQL query in the UIM database to update the table for the new target.
      Target
      is the new QoS target to be set and
      Source
      is the QoS source for which target is changed. You can configure both the values, as applicable.
      Declare @Target varchar(100) Declare @Source varchar(100)
      SELECT @Target = 'Total'
      SELECT @Source = 'tsuse10-32'
      UPDATE dbo.s_qos_data
      SET target=@Target+RIGHT(target,2)
      WHERE source LIKE @Source
      AND probe LIKE 'cdm'
      AND qos IN ('qos_cpu_multi_usage')
      AND (target NOT LIKE 'User%'
      AND target NOT LIKE 'System%'
      AND target NOT LIKE 'Wait%'
      AND target NOT LIKE 'Idle%')
  5. Select
    Set QoS target as 'Memory'
    in the
    Memory & paging properties
    to specify the QoS target for memory and paging as
    Memory
    . The following SQL scripts demonstrate how to update old data in the database when the QoS target as
    Memory
    is changed:
    • Execute the following SQL query in the UIM database to view the rows to be updated:
      SELECT * FROM dbo.s_qos_data
      WHERE probe LIKE 'cdm'
      AND (qos LIKE'QOS_MEMORY_PERC_USAGE'
      OR qos LIKE 'QOS_MEMORY_PAGING_PGPS'
      OR qos LIKE 'QOS_MEMORY_PAGING'
      OR qos LIKE 'QOS_MEMORY_PHYSICAL'
      OR qos LIKE 'QOS_MEMORY_PHYSICAL_PERC'
      OR qos LIKE 'QOS_MEMORY_SWAP'
      OR qos LIKE 'QOS_MEMORY_SWAP_PERC'
      OR qos LIKE 'QOS_PHYSICAL_MEMORY_TOTAL')
    • Execute the following SQL query in the UIM database to update the table for the new target.
      Target
      is the new QoS target to be set. You can configure the value.
      Declare @Target varchar(100)
      SELECT @Target = 'Memory'
      UPDATE dbo.s_qos_data
      SET target=@Target
      WHERE probe LIKE 'cdm'
      AND (qos LIKE'QOS_MEMORY_PERC_USAGE'
      OR qos LIKE 'QOS_MEMORY_PAGING_PGPS'
      OR qos LIKE 'QOS_MEMORY_PAGING'
      OR qos LIKE 'QOS_MEMORY_PHYSICAL'
      OR qos LIKE 'QOS_MEMORY_PHYSICAL_PERC'
      OR qos LIKE 'QOS_MEMORY_SWAP'
      OR qos LIKE 'QOS_MEMORY_SWAP_PERC'
      OR qos LIKE 'QOS_PHYSICAL_MEMORY_TOTAL')
  6. Click
    Apply.
Configure Alarm and QoS Properties
You can configure the following alarm and QoS properties of the probe:
3
3
Configure Cluster Alarm and QoS Source
The probe automatically detects and displays the list of virtual groups belonging to the cluster.  You can configure the alarm and QoS source for each virtual group as one of the following parameters:
  • <cluster ip>:
    The IP address of the cluster.
  • <cluster name>:
    The name of the cluster.
  • <cluster name>.<group name>:
    A combination of the cluster name and the group name
The
Cluster
tab is available only when the monitored system is part of a cluster and the
cluster
probe is deployed on the robot.
Follow these steps:
  1. Navigate to the
    Setup > Cluster
    tab.
    The probe displays all the cluster groups that include the monitored host.
  2. Double-click the required cluster from the list to display the
    Group sources
    dialog.
    The probe displays the group name in the
    Virtual group
    field.
  3. Update the following information to configure the alarm and QoS source:
    • Alarm source:
      specifies the source to be used for alarms.
      Default: <cluster ip>
    • QoS source:
      specifies the source to be used for QoS messages.
      Default: <cluster ip>
  4. Click
    OK
    to close the dialog.
  5. Click
    Apply
    .
Configure Alarm Thresholds for CPU, Memory, and Paging
You can configure the alarm thresholds for the following parameters:
  • CPU usage
  • Memory usage: total, swap, and physical
  • Paging activity
Follow these steps:
  1. Navigate to the
    Status
    tab.
  2. Select the checkbox next to the applicable field to enable the respective threshold.
    CA recommends you to specify a higher severity alarm (Default severity: Error) for High threshold and a lower severity alarm (Default severity: Warning) for Low threshold.
  3. Update the following information in the
    CPU usage
    section.
    • High:
      specifies the maximum CPU usage when the probe generates a higher severity alarm.
    • Low:
      specifies the maximum CPU usage when the probe generates a lower severity alarm.
  4. In the
    Memory usage
    section, select one of the following memory categories to specify the threshold:
    • M:
      allows you to specify the threshold values for total memory usage.
    • S:
      allows you to specify the threshold values for swap memory usage.
    • P:
      allows you to specify the threshold values for physical memory usage.
  5. Update the following information. The values in these fields depend on the selected memory category in
    Step 4
    .
    • High:
      specifies the maximum memory usage when the probe generates a higher severity alarm.
    • Low:
      specifies the maximum memory usage when the probe generates a lower severity alarm.
  6. (Optional)
    Repeat
    Step 4
    and
    Step 5
    for required memory categories.
  7. Update the following information in the
    Paging activity
    section:
    • High:
      specifies the maximum number of the paging data operations in a second when the probe generates a higher severity alarm.
    • Low:
      specifies the maximum number of the paging data operations in a second when the probe generates a lower severity alarm.
  8. Click
    Apply
    .
Configure Alarm Thresholds for Multi-CPU
You can specify the alarm thresholds for multi-CPU systems. A multi-CPU (multi-core processor) is a single computing component with two or more independent processors called cores. Each core individually reads and executes program instructions. A multi-core processor implements multiprocessing in a single physical package.
Follow these steps
:
  1. Navigate to the
    Multi CPU
    tab.
    This tab is available only when the probe is monitoring a multi-CPU computer.
  2. Select the checkbox next to the applicable field to enable the respective threshold.
  3. Update the following information in the
    Alarm on
    section:
    • Maximum:
      specifies the maximum usage of any CPU in a multi-CPU system. The probe generates an alarm if the CPU usage is greater than the specified value.
    • Difference:
      specifies the maximum difference in usage between any two CPUs in a multi-CPU system. The probe generates an alarm if the difference is greater than the specified value.
  4. Click
    Apply
    .
Configure Advanced Monitoring Properties
You can configure the probe to generate QoS messages for the following components:
  • CPU: single and multi-CPU systems
  • CPU load average
  • Memory: total, swap, and physical
  • Physical Memory: total physical memory (RAM) available for a system.
You can also configure the following monitoring properties:
  • Alarms on processor queue length and system reboot
  • CPU usage parameters
  • Paging measurement unit
Follow these steps
:
  1. Navigate to the
    Advanced
    tab.
  2. Select the applicable QoS parameters from the following fields:
    • (Windows only) Processor Queue Length
      : enables you to generate QoS messages for the number of queued processes divided by the number of processors waiting for CPU time for the system.
      This field is available as
      System Load (Processor Queue Length)
      on AIX, SGI, Linux, and Solaris platforms.
    • Computer uptime (hourly):
      enables you to generate hourly QoS messages for the computer uptime (in seconds).
    • (AIX, SGI, Linux, and Solaris) Load Average 1 min:
      enables you to generate QoS messages for the average CPU usage during the last one minute
      .
      Default: Not Selected
    • (AIX, SGI, Linux, and Solaris) Load Average 5 min:
      enables you to generate QoS messages for the average CPU usage during the last five minutes.
      Default: Not Selected
    • (AIX, SGI, Linux, and Solaris) Load Average 15 min:
      enables you to generate QoS messages for the average CPU usage during the last fifteen minutes.Default: Not Selected
      The probe does not use sampling for the three load average QoS messages. The values are calculated for each processor if
      Calculate Load Average per Processor
      is selected
      in the
      Setup > General
      tab.
    • Memory Usage:
      enables you to generate QoS messages for the amount of total available memory (physical and virtual memory) used in Mbytes.
    • Memory in %:
      enables you to generate QoS messages for the amount of total available memory (physical and virtual memory) used in %.
    • Memory Paging in Kb/s:
      enables you to generate QoS messages for the amount of paging virtual memory in Kbytes/second.
    • Memory Paging in Pg/s:
      enables you to generate QoS messages for the amount of paging virtual memory in pages per second.
      If you use probe version 3.70 or earlier, the QoS settings in the GUI are different from that in version 3.72. However, if you have already created QoS entries in the database for kilobytes per second (KB/s) and pages per second (Pg/s) or both using probe version 3.70 or earlier, these entries are retained and updated with QoS data from the probe version 3.72 and higher.
    • Physical Memory Usage:
      enables you to generate QoS messages for the amount of total available physical memory used in Kbytes.
    • Physical Memory in %:
      enables you to generate QoS messages for the amount of total available physical memory used in %.
    • Swap Memory Usage:
      enables you to generate QoS messages for the space on the disk used for the swap file in Kbytes.
    • Swap Memory in %:
      enables you to generate QoS messages for the space on the disk used for the swap file in %.
    • Physical Memory:
      enables you to generate QoS messages for the total physical memory (RAM only) available for the system.
    • (From version 6.10 on AIX only, with Active Memory Expansion (AME) enabled) Memory Expansion Factor:
      enables you to generate QoS messages for the target memory expansion factor that you have configured in your system to increase the total physical memory of a logical partition (LPAR).
    • (From version 6.10 on AIX only, with AME mode enabled) Memory Xphysc:
      enables you to generate QoS messages for the number of physical processors used for AME.
    • (From version 6.10 on AIX only) Smt:
      enables you to generate QoS messages for the number of simultaneous multithreads in the partition.
    • (From version 6.10 on AIX only, with AME mode enabled) Memory Dxm:
      enables you to generate QoS and alarm messages for the memory deficit in megabytes. At times, an LPAR cannot be configured with the provided memory expansion factor as it is too large, and the workload in the LPAR does not compress well. Thus, a memory deficit is created.
    • (From version 6.10 on AIX only) Total Memory:
      enables you to generate QoS messages for the total memory size of an LPAR in megabytes.
  3. Select the applicable QoS parameters in the
    Total CPU
    tab from the following fields:
    • CPU Usage (Total):
      enables you to generate QoS messages for the total CPU usage. The probe does not include tasks such as input/output as the CPU usage remains 0%.
      The
      CPU Usage (Total)
      QoS message includes user and system CPU usage. The probe also includes the CPU wait information in the message if you select
      CPU Wait is included in CPU Usage (Total)
      in the
      CPU Usage options
      section.
    • CPU User:
      enables you to generate QoS messages for the CPU usage on user tasks.
    • CPU System:
      enables you to generate QoS messages for the CPU usage on system tasks.
    • CPU Wait:
      enables you to generate QoS messages for the time that the CPU waits to access external devices or memory.
    • CPU Idle:
      enables you to generate QoS messages for the time the CPU runs idle without processing anything.
  4. (Multi-CPU Systems only)
    Select the applicable QoS parameters in the
    Individual CPU
    tab from the following fields:
    • Individual CPU Usage (Total):
      enables you to generate QoS messages for the total CPU usage. The probe does not include tasks such as input/output as the CPU usage remains 0%.
      The
      Individual CPU Usage (Total)
      QoS message includes user and system CPU usage. The probe also includes CPU wait information in the message if you select
      CPU Wait is included in CPU Usage (Total)
      in the
      CPU Usage options
      section.
    • Individual CPU User:
      enables you to generate QoS messages for the CPU usage on user tasks.
    • Individual CPU System:
      enables you to generate QoS messages for the CPU usage on system tasks.
    • Individual CPU Wait:
      enables you to generate QoS messages for the time that the CPU waits to access external devices or memory.
    • Individual CPU Idle:
      enables you to generate QoS messages for the time the CPU runs idle without processing anything.
  5. Select
    Alarm on Processor Queue Length
    to enable alarms on the maximum length of the processor queue.
    This field is available as
    Alarm on System Load
    on AIX, SGI, Linux, and Solaris platforms.
  6. Update the following information to configure alarms on the length of processor queue:
    • Max. Queue Length:
      specifies the maximum length of the processor queue before the probe generates an alarm.
      On multi-CPU systems, the queued processes are shared on the number of processors. For example, if running on a system with four processors and using the default Max Queue Length value (4), alarm messages are generated if the number of queued processes exceeds 16.
    • Message id:
      specifies the alarm message to use when the length of the processor queue is greater than the specified value.
  7. Select
    Detected reboot
    in the
    Alarm on
    section to generate an alarm when the probe detects a system reboot.
  8. Update the following information in the
    CPU Usage options
    section:
    • CPU Wait is included in CPU Usage (Total):
      enables you to add the CPU wait time to the total CPU usage of all and individual CPUs.
    • (AIX only) CPU stats. against entitled capacity:
      calculates the CPU usage based on the entitled capacity.
      The formula to calculate CPU usage on AIX system is:
      Lparstat –i command
      Total Capacity =( maxVirtualCPU/ maxCapacity)*100;
      CPU User = CPU user *EntCap)/TotCapacity;
      cpuStats->fSystem = (double)((cpuStats->fSystem * cpuStats->fEntCap)/TotCapacity);
      cpuStats->fWait = (double)((cpuStats->fWait * cpuStats->fEntCap)/TotCapacity);
      cpuStats->fIdle = (double)((cpuStats->fIdle * cpuStats->fEntCap)/TotCapacity);
    • Top CPU consuming processes in alarm:
      specifies the number of top CPU consuming processes that are included in CPU usage alarms.
      Default: 5Consider the following points while using this option:
      • This alarm is generated when the defined total CPU usage is breached. The new alarms generate the process information in the following format:
        [processname[pid]-cpu%]; [processname[pid]-cpu%]
      • The actual CPU value in the alarm may not always match the total percentage of all the top CPU consuming processes shown in the alarm message. It may vary as Total CPU Usage is calculated on the basis of samples. The probe retrieves the raw data at a given time and displays in the alarm.
      • For non-Windows platform, the probe uses
        ps
        command to retrieve the top CPU consuming processes.
      • Depending on your environment, the values achieved (%) can be over 100%. For example, the monitoring environment includes the 56-core system using hyper-threading. In this case, the number of virtual cores, because of hyper-threading (more than 1 thread per core), becomes twice that value (2 threads per core). If the user has up to 112 virtual cores (112 = 56*2), the maximum possible value (%) from
        Top CPU consuming processes
        can be 11200% (112 virtual cores * 100). This explains why a user may see CPU consuming values over 100% or 1000% or 5000%.
  9. Update the following information in the
    Memory Usage options
    section:
    • Top Memory consuming processes in alarm:
      specifies the number of top memory consuming processes that are included in memory usage alarms. Default: 5
  10. Select from the following options in the
    Paging measured in
    section to configure the unit for paging activity messages:
    • Kilobytes per second:
      enables the probe to use paging activity as data that is sent to or read from virtual memory in Kbytes/second.
    • Pages per second:
      enables the probe to use paging activity as the number of paging operations on the virtual memory in pages/second.
    Default: Kilobytes per second
    When changing the paging selection, the header of the Paging graph on the
    Status
    tab immediately changes to show the selected unit, but the values in the graph do not change until the next sample is measured.
  11. Click
    Apply
    .
Configure Alarms and QoS for Disk Usage
You can configure the probe to monitor local, clustered, and shared disks over the network. When monitoring cluster or shared disks (such as NFS mounts) over low-performance or over-utilized lines, the response time can be slow.
The NFS mounts monitored in the cdm probe point to servers. These servers also appear during discovery in USM.
You can generate QoS messages and alarms for the following disk performance categories:
  • Disk usage on local, clustered, and shared disks (in percentage or megabytes)
  • Change in disk usage on local and clustered disks (in megabytes or percentage)
The probe uses the mount entries as in /proc/mounts file in Linux to display the file system type of devices that are remounted to a different location.
Follow these steps:
  1. Navigate to the
    Status
    tab.
  2. (Optional)
    Right-click a shared or network disk and select
    Enable space monitoring
    to monitor availability state and usage of shared and network disks using any robot where the probe is deployed.
    : The
    Enable space monitoring
    option appears only for the shared drive/folder (using the
    New Share...
    option) that is monitored by the cdm probe.
  3. (Optional)
    Right-click in the
    Disk usage
    section and select
    Modify Default Disk Parameters
    to open the
    Fixed Disk Properties
    dialog and configure the default properties for disk monitoring. Select
    Active
    in the
    Present
    tab to apply the default parameters to all disks. The probe also generates alarms if a configured disk is missing.
  4. Right-click a disk in the
    Disk usage
    section and select
    Edit
    to open the
    Drive name
    dialog.
  5. Update the following information to configure alarms on disk usage in the
    Disk usage and thresholds
    tab. The tab also displays the total, used, and free space on the disk.
    CA recommends you to specify a higher severity alarm (Default severity: Error) for High threshold and a lower severity alarm (Default severity: Warning) for Low threshold.
    • Monitor disk using:
      select from the following options to specify the measuring criteria for disk usage:
      • MB:
        enables the probe to generate disk usage alarms in megabytes.
      • % :
        enables the probe to generate disk usage alarms in percentage.
    • High:
      specifies the minimum free disk space and the applicable higher severity alarm message. The probe generates the alarm if the free disk space is lower than or equal to the specified value.
    • Low:
      specifies the minimum free disk space and the applicable lower severity alarm message. The probe generates the alarm if the free disk space is lower than or equal to the specified value.
    You can also view the average free space of the last 4 collected samples.
  6. Select the applicable QoS messages that the probe generates for disk usage in the
    Quality of Service message
    section:
    • on Disk usage in Mb:
      enables the probe to generate QoS messages on disk usage (in megabytes).
    • on Disk usage in %:
      enables the probe to generate QoS messages on disk usage (in percentage).
    • on Disk Free in Mb:
      enables the probe to generate QoS messages on free disk space (in megabytes).
    • on Disk Free in %:
      enables the probe to generate QoS messages on free disk space (in percentage).
  7. Navigate to the
    Disk usage change and thresholds
    tab to configure QoS and alarms for change in disk usage.
  8. Select one of the following options to configure disk usage change calculation:
    • Change summarized over all samples:
      enables the probe to use the difference between the latest sample and the first sample. The number of samples that the probe stores in memory for threshold comparison is set in
      Samples
      on the
      Setup
      >
      Control Properties
      tab.
      : There can be discrepancies between the values in QoS and values in alarms when the
      Change summarized over all samples
      option is selected. This is because the QoS are generated on every interval and alarms are generated based on the selection of the option
      Change summarized over all samples
      .
    • Change between each sample:
      The change in disk usage will be calculated after each sample is collected.
  9. Update the following information to configure alarms for change in disk usage:
    CA recommends you to specify a higher severity alarm (Default severity: Error) for High threshold and a lower severity alarm (Default severity: Warning) for Low threshold.
    • Type of change:
      allows you to specify whether alarms are generated on increase, decrease, or both increase and decrease in disk usage.
    • Monitor disk usage change using:
      select from the following options to specify the measuring criteria for disk usage change:
      • MB:
        enables the probe to generate disk usage change alarms in megabytes.
      • % :
        enables the probe to generate disk usage change alarms in percentage.
    • High:
      specifies the maximum change in disk usage and the applicable higher severity alarm message. The probe generates the alarm if the change in disk usage is equal to or greater than the specified value.
    • Low:
      specifies the minimum change in disk usage and the applicable lower severity alarm message. The probe generates the alarm if the change in disk usage is equal to or greater than the specified value.
  10. Select the applicable QoS messages that the probe generates for disk usage change in the
    Quality of Service message
    section:
    • on Disk Usage change in Mb:
      enables the probe to generate QoS messages on change in disk usage (in megabytes).
    • on Disk Usage change in %:
      enables the probe to generate QoS messages on change in disk usage (in percentage).
  11. Click
    OK
    to close the dialog.
  12. Click
    Apply
    .
(UNIX only) Configure Inode Disk Monitoring
You can view the number of total, used, and free inodes on the filesystem. You can configure thresholds for alarms and QoS.
Follow these steps:
  1. Navigate to the
    Status
    tab.
  2. (Optional)
    Right-click a shared disk and select
    Enable space monitoring
    to configure disk usage on shared disks.
  3. Right-click a disk in the
    Disk usage
    section and select
    Edit
    to open the
    Drive name
    dialog.
    You can also configure the default properties for inode monitoring. Right-click in the
    Disk usage
    section and select
    Modify Default Disk Parameters
    to open the
    Fixed Disk Properties
    dialog. Select
    Active
    in the
    Present
    tab to apply the default parameters to all disks. The probe also generates alarms if a configured disk is missing.
  4. Navigate to the
    Inode usage and thresholds
    tab.
  5. Update the following information to configure alarms for inode usage:
    CA recommends you to specify a higher severity alarm (Default severity: Error) for High threshold and a lower severity alarm (Default severity: Warning) for Low threshold.
    • Monitor inodes using:
      select from the following options to specify the measuring criteria for inode usage:
      • inodes:
        enables the probe to generate inode usage alarms in number of inodes.
      • % :
        enables the probe to generate inode usage alarms in percentage.
    • High:
      specifies the minimum free inode space and the applicable higher severity alarm message. The probe generates the alarm if the free disk space is lower than the specified value.
    • Low:
      specifies the minimum free inode space and the applicable lower severity alarm message. The probe generates the alarm if the free disk space is lower than the specified value.
  6. Select the applicable QoS messages that the probe generates for inode usage:
    • on Inode usage in inode count:
      enables the probe to generate QoS messages on inode usage (in number of inodes).
    • on Inode usage in %:
      enables the probe to generate QoS messages on inode usage (in percentage).
  7. Click
    OK
    to close the dialog.
  8. Click
    Apply
    .
Monitor Network Disk Availability
You can monitor the availability of NFS disks and generate alarm and QoS messages.
Follow these steps:
  1. Navigate to the
    Status
    tab.
  2. Right-click a shared or network disk and select
    Enable space monitoring
    .
  3. Right-click the shared or network disk in the
    Disk usage
    section and select
    Edit
    to open the
    Drive name
    dialog.
  4. Update the following information to configure the QoS on disk availability.
    • Network Drive
      : specifies the network drive location.
    • Mountpoint
      : the server where the mount point is pointing.
    • Error message
      : specifies the error message that is generated when the network disk is unavailable.
    • Disk Available Quality of Service message
      : allows you to generate QoS message when the network disk is not available.
      : When the space monitoring option is not enabled (
      Enable space monitoring
      option present on right click of network disk in the
      Disk Usage
      section) and you enable the option
      Disk Available Quality of Service message
      , the probe may generate QoS for the disks that are available and mounted but in Stale condition.
  5. Click
    OK
    to close the dialog and enable the probe to generate QoS messages for the network disk availability.
Monitor Shared Disk Availability
You can monitor the availability of shared (network) disks and generate alarm and QoS messages.
Follow these steps:
  1. Navigate to the
    Status
    tab.
  2. Right-click in the
    Disk usage
    section and select
    New Share
    .
  3. Specify the path of the shared disk.
  4. Click
    OK
    to open the
    Disk name
    dialog.
  5. Update the following fields in the
    Share Properties
    section:
    • Share:
      displays the path of the shared disk.
    • User:
      specifies the username of the account that can access the shared disk.
    • Password:
      specifies the password for the specified
      User
      .
    • Message:
      specifies the alarm that the probe generates when connection to the shared disk fails.
  6. Select
    Folder Availability Quality of Service Message
    to enable the probe to generate QoS messages for the shared folder availability.
  7. Click
    OK
    to close the dialog.
  8. Click
    Apply
    .
The folder to be mounted on Linux should have the "sharing"  option. Use the  following  command to mount  a windows folder on Linux:
mount -t cifs -o username=administrator,password=<password>//<machine_name_to_mount>/data/windows
Once the drive is added, the type appears as “Network”.
(Optional) Configure Active Messages
You can associate alarm messages with the applicable thresholds. You can configure alarms for CPU, disk, memory, computer, and other parameters.
Follow these steps:
  1. Navigate to the
    Setup > Message definitions > CPU
    tab.
  2. Drag-and-drop the applicable messages from the
    Message pool
    to configure the following sections:
    • CPU usage:
      allows you to configure the following alarms for total CPU usage. CA recommends you to specify a higher severity alarm (Default severity: Error) for High threshold and a lower severity alarm (Default severity: Warning) for Low threshold.
      • High threshold:
        specifies the (error) alarm message to generate when the total CPU usage is greater than the specified high threshold.
        Default: CpuErrorProcesses
      • Low threshold:
        specifies the (warning) alarm message to generate when the total CPU usage is greater than the specified low threshold.
        Default: CpuWarningProcesses
    • Individual CPU usage:
      allows you to configure the following alarms for CPU usage of individual CPUs. The configuration is only applicable for multi-CPU systems.
      • CPU maximum:
        specifies the alarm message to generate when the individual CPU usage is greater than the specified threshold.
        Default: CpuMultiMaxError
      • CPU difference:
        specifies the alarm message to generate when the difference in usage of two CPUs is greater than the specified threshold.
        Default: CpuMultiDiffError
  3. Navigate to the
    Setup > Message definitions > Disk
    tab. You can modify the alarm messages for disks through the
    Status
    tab.
  4. Navigate to the
    Setup > Message definitions > Memory
    tab.
  5. Drag-and-drop the applicable messages from the
    Message pool
    to configure the following sections. The probe generates the alarms for total, swap, or physical memory. The alarms are based on the view selected in the
    Status
    tab.
    CA recommends you to specify a higher severity alarm (Default severity: Error) for High threshold and a lower severity alarm (Default severity: Warning) for Low threshold.
    • Pagefile usage:
      allows you to configure the following alarms for pagefile usage.
      • High threshold:
        specifies the (error) alarm message to generate when the pagefile usage is greater than the specified high threshold.
        Default: PagefileError
      • Low threshold:
        specifies the (warning) alarm message to generate when the pagefile usage is greater than the specified low threshold.
        Default: PagefileWarning
    • Paging activity:
      allows you to configure the following alarms for paging data transfers per second.
      • High threshold:
        specifies the (error) alarm message to generate when the paging data transfers per second is greater than the specified high threshold.
        Default: PagingError
      • Low threshold:
        specifies the (warning) alarm message to generate when the paging data transfers per second is greater than the specified low threshold.
        Default: PagingWarning
  6. Navigate to the
    Setup > Message definitions > Computer
    tab.
  7. Drag-and-drop the applicable message from the
    Message pool
    to the
    Message
    field to configure the
    Computer boot alarm
    section. The alarm generates when a monitored system reboots.
    Default: BootAlarm
  8. Navigate to the
    Setup > Message definitions > Other
    tab.
  9. Drag-and-drop the applicable message from the
    Message pool
    to the
    Message
    field. The alarm generates when the probe is unable to retrieve monitoring information.
    Default: InternalAlarm
  10. Click
    Apply
    .
(Optional) Create Custom Profiles
The probe provides flexibility to add custom profiles and to these profiles you can add thresholds based on your requirements. So you can create a profile and add threshold based on percentage usage. You can also add another custom profile and add threshold based on space usage.You can configure custom profiles in the probe for CPU, Disk, and Memory resources that are not currently available in the monitored system. For example, you can create a custom profile for a cluster disk that is only temporarily available in the system.
Follow these steps:
  1. Navigate to the
    Custom
    tab.
  2. Right-click in the
    Profiles
    section and select from the following options:
    • New CPU Profile:
      allows you to create a custom CPU profile.
    • New Disk Profile:
      allows you to create a custom disk profile.
    • New Memory Profile:
      allows you to create a custom memory profile.
  3. Specify a
    Name
    and
    Description
    for the profile.
  4. (CPU Profile)
    Specify whether the probe generates alarms for average CPU or individual CPU on multi-CPU systems from the
    Alarm on
    drop-down list. Configure the alarm and QoS parameters, as required.
  5. (Disk Profile)
    Select the type of the disk from the
    New Disk Profile
    dialog and click
    OK
    . Configure the alarm and QoS parameters, as required.
  6. Update the following information to configure the disk properties:
    • Regular Expression for Mount point:
      allows you to specify a regular expression to filter through mount points.
    • Mount point:
      allows you to select a mount point for the disk.
    • Device:
      specifies the name of the device the disk is connected to.
  7. (Memory Profile)
    Configure the alarm and QoS parameters, as required.
    • Top Memory consuming processes in alarm:
      specifies the number of top memory consuming processes that are included in memory usage alarms.
      Default: 5
  8. Click
    OK
    to close the dialog and create the profile.
  9. Select the checkbox next to the profile name in the
    Profiles
    section to activate the profile.
  10. Click
    Apply
    .
(Optional) View Current Values in Probe Interface
You can view the current monitored values in the probe interface for the following components:
  • CPU usage
  • Memory usage (total, swap, and physical)
  • Paging activity
  • Disk usage
  • Multi-CPU usage
Follow these steps:
  1. Navigate to the
    Status
    tab. You can view the CPU usage, memory usage, and paging activity graphs. The
    Disk usage
    section displays the total, used, and free space on the disk.
  2. Right-click the required graph and select from the following graph-view options:
    • As 2D line
    • As 2D bar
    • As 2D area
    • As 3D line
    • As 3D bar
    • As 3D area
  3. (Memory usage)
    You can also select from the following options to filter through the type of memory data:
    • M:
      allows you to view the values for total memory usage.
    • S:
      allows you to view the values for swap memory usage.
    • P:
      allows you to view the values for physical memory usage.
  4. Navigate to the
    Multi CPU
    tab. You can view the CPU usage graph of each individual CPU in the system.
  5. Select the required individual CPU from
    Select processors to view
    to view the graph of only the selected CPU.
  6. Click the
    Update
    button to refresh the graphs to the current values. Clicking the
    Update
    button displays the current values only in the probe interface. QoS and alarms use monitored values at configured intervals.
(Optional) Configure Alarm Messages
You can create alarm messages, as required. You can then select the message at the applicable field in the probe.
Follow these steps
:
  1. Navigate to the
    Setup > Message definitions
    tab.
  2. Right-click in the Message pool and select
    New
    . You can also click
    Edit
    to modify an existing message.
  3. Update the following information to configure the message properties:
    • Message text:
      specifies the text for the alarm message. You can use a $ sign to select variables from a list.
    • Severity:
      specifies the severity of the alarm.
      Default: Information
    • Message token:
      specifies the category of the alarm message to be identified in USM.
    • Message subsystem:
      defines the subsystem ID of the message.
      CA recommends you to not assign the same subsystem ID to different messages.
  4. Click
    OK
    to save the message.
  5. Click
    Apply
    .
You can use following variables with a message to create an alarm:
  • $boot_time
  • $check_description
  • $check_name
  • $cpu_multi_diff_err_name
  • $cpu_multi_max_err_name
  • $description
  • $device
  • $directory
  • $disk
  • $drive
  • $error
  • $faverage
  • $fcpu_idle
  • $fcpu_system
  • $fcpu_usage
  • $fcpu_used
  • $fcpu_user
  • $fidle
  • $fidle_average
  • $file
  • $filesys
  • $filesystemtype
  • $fiowait
  • $fiowait_average
  • $fmax_average
  • $fproc_qlength
  • $fsystem_average
  • $fusage_average
  • $fuser_average
  • $hostname
  • $icount
  • $icpu_id
  • $id
  • $isample
  • $isamples
  • $laverage
  • $limit
  • $llast_val
  • $max_min_diff
  • $max_processor_index
  • $min_processor_index
  • $netstatus
  • $robotname
  • $situation
  • $size
  • $size_gb
  • $size_mb
  • $space
  • $type
  • $unit
  • $value
  • $value_last
  • $value_limit
  • $value_number
  • $iostat_name
  • $processes
More Information: