Discovery Profiles

Discovery profiles specify how discovery operates. Discovery profiles determine the IP domain, IP addresses, IP address ranges, and host names for discovery. You can only specify one IP domain for each discovery profile. Newly discovered devices are created in the selected IP domain.
capm320
HID_Discovery_Profiles
Discovery profiles specify how discovery operates. Discovery profiles determine the IP domain, IP addresses, IP address ranges, and host names for discovery. You can only specify one IP domain for each discovery profile. Newly discovered devices are created in the selected IP domain.
When multiple Data Collectors are deployed in one IP domain, each Data Collector issues a discovery request to each device as specified by the discovery profile. When more than one Data Collector can contact a device, a specific Data Collector is randomly selected to monitor the device. Review the capacity of the Data Collectors and rebalance as required. For more information, see Rebalance the Load on Data Collector
Discovery profiles are only accessible to users in the tenant space where the discovery profile was created. Users that are assigned to the Default Tenant can access discovery profiles in the Default Tenant space. Log in to the correct tenant
before
you create a discovery profile.
Administrators can manage discovery profiles through the UI or through the Data Aggregator REST web services. Log in as a tenant administrator to perform these tasks.
The following video walks through a single device discovery:

Create Discovery Profiles
To specify how inventory discovery operates in your environment, create discovery profiles. To optimize discovery and reduce SNMP traffic, set up granular discovery profiles:
  • Use separate discovery profiles for each group of devices that share an SNMP profile.
  • Use separate discovery profiles for groups of devices that require different rediscovery schedules.
Follow these steps:
  1. Select 
    Administration
    , and click the Data Aggregator data source.
  2. Click
    Discovery Profiles
    from the Monitored Inventory menu.
  3. Click
    New
    .
  4. Specify a name and select an IP Domain.
    The following characters are not permitted:
    • Single quotes
    • Double quotes
    • Backward slashes
    • Forward slashes
    • Ampersands
  5. Select the IPs/Hosts tab and do one or more of the following actions:
    • (Optional) Navigate to and import a CSV file of IP addresses. The CSV file can contain a comma-separated list of IPv4 addresses, IPv6 addresses, IPv4 address ranges, and hostnames. Browse to select the file and click
      Open
      .
      To apply Chinese characters to the alias name, save the CSV file in UTF-8 format.
    • Specify IP address ranges, individual IP addresses, and host names. Comma-delimited values are accepted.
      If an IP range includes multiple IP addresses, and one of the IP addresses maps to the hostname, discovery always uses the hostname IP as the primary IP address.
  6. (Optional) To regularly update information for discovered devices and discover new devices, configure a schedule for the discovery profile. Select the
    Schedule
    tab, and specify a schedule.
  7. (Optional) To use specific SNMP profiles, select the
    SNMP
    tab, and complete the following steps:
    1. Select 
      Use specific list of assigned SNMP profiles
      .
    2. Move one or more SNMP profiles from the list of available profiles to the assigned list.
    Using a subset of SNMP profiles reduces SNMP traffic.
  8. Select the Advanced tab, and configure advanced options:
    • Naming Order
      Change the attribute priority, which the system uses to name the discovered devices. Any device item that the discovery profile creates is named with the highest available naming convention. If a higher priority attribute is unavailable for the device,
      CA Performance Management
      uses the next highest priority attribute. For virtual machines,
      CA Performance Management
      ignores the naming order and uses the names from vCenter.
      If you use host name to name devices, the device name is updated automatically when the hostname changes. If you use another attribute, such as system name, the change to the device name occurs when the discovery profile runs again. Run discovery manually or configure a schedule for the discovery profile.
      In some unusual configurations, the network might not have unique DNS host names. To reconcile devices by the IP address and system name only, select
      Exclude Host Name
      .
    • ICMP Discovery
      To determine if a device can respond to ICMP, select
      Use ICMP
      .
      To create pingables for devices that respond to ICMP but not SNMP, select
      Create Pingables
      .
  9. Click
    Save
    .
    The discovery profile is created and is displayed in the Discovery Profiles list. If the profile has a schedule, discovery runs at the scheduled time.
Discovery Profile IP Ranges
In a discovery profile, you can specify the IP address ranges that you want to discover for IPv4. Range discovery is not supported for IPv6 addresses.
When you specify IP ranges in the discovery profile, the following rules apply:
  • An IPv4 range can contain wildcards (
    *
    ). A wildcard represents a full range for an IP octet: 0-255 
  • An IPv4 range can contain hyphens (
    -
    ). A hyphen can exist between the lower IP address and upper IP address. A hyphen can also be in the IP octets in the lower IP address.
Examples: Valid IP Ranges
  • Both of the following examples attempt to discover devices at every IP address from 10.25.1.0 to 10.25.1.190:
    10.25.1.0-10.25.1.190
    OR
    10.25.1.0-190
  • Both of the following examples attempt to discover devices at every IP address from 10.25.0.0 to 10.25.255.255:
    10.25.*.* 
    OR
    10.25.0.0 - 10.25.255.255
  • Both of the following examples attempt to discover devices at every IP address from 10.25.0.3 to 10.25.0.40 and from 10.25.1.3 to 10.25.1.40:
    10.25.0-1.3-40
    OR
    10.25.0.3 - 10.25.0.40, 10.25.1.3 - 10.25.1.40
  • Both of the following examples attempt to discover devices at every IP address from 10.25.0.0 to 10.25.0.5, from 10.25.1.0 to 10.25.1.5, and so on, up to 10.25.255.0 to 10.25.255.5:
    10.25.*.0-5
    OR
    10.25.0.0 - 10.25.0.5, 10.25.1.0 - 10.25.1.5 ... 10.25.255.0 - 10.25.255.5
Examples: Invalid IP Ranges
  • The following example is invalid because the upper IP address is incomplete:
    10.25.1.0 - 10.23
  • The following example is invalid because when a hyphen (-) is used in an octet in the lower IP address, the upper IP address cannot be present:
    10.25.1.0-190 - 10.25.1.255
  • The following example is invalid because when a wildcard (*) is used in an octet in the lower IP address, the upper IP address cannot be present:
    10.25.*.0 - 10.25.255.255
  • The following example is invalid because it is unclear whether the wildcard octet (1*) implies 10.25.10-19.0 or 10.25.10-199.0:
    10.25.1*.0